ACADEMIC INTEGRATION COMPETITIVE EXCELLENCE

IN DIVISION I ATHLETICS

 

Media Center: Harvard Crimson Football - All-Time Coaching Records

Years Coach Seasons W L T Pct.
1874-80 coached by captains 8 17 8 5 .650
1881 Lucius N. Littauer 1 6 1 1 .812
1882-84 coached by captains 3 22 7 0 .759
1885 play suspended          
1886 Frank A. Mason 1 12 2 0 .857
1887-89 coached by captains 3 31 4 0 .886
1890-92

George A. Stewart & George C. Adams

3 34 2 0 .944
1893 George A. Stewart& Everett G. Lake 1 12 1 0 .923
1894 William A. Brooks 1 11 2 0 .846
1895 Robert W. Emmons 1 8 2 1 .773
1896 Bertram G. Waters 1 7 4 0 .636
1897-98 W. Cameron Forbes 2 21 1 1 .935
1899-1900 Benjamin H. Dibblee 1 20 1 1 .932
1901 William T. Reid 1 12 0 0 1.000
1902 John W. Farley 1 11 1 0 .917
1903 John S. Cranston 1 9 3 0 .750
1904 Edgar N. Wrightington 1 7 2 1 .750
1905-06 William T. Reid 2 18 3 1 .841
  (career totals: 3 seasons, 30-3-1, .897)          
1907 Joshua Crane 1 7 3 0 .700
1908-16 Percy D. Haughton 9 71 7 5 .886
+1917 Wingate Rollins 1 3 1 3 .643
+1918 Pooch Donovan 1 2 1 0 .667
1919-25 Robert T. Fisher 7 43 14 5 .734
1926-30 Arnold Horween 5 21 17 3 .549
1931-34 Edward L. Casey 4 20 11 1 .641
1935-42 Richard C. Harlow 8 29 29 7 .500
1943-44 Henry N. Lamar 2 7 3 1 .682
1945-47 Richard C. Harlow 3 16 10 0 .615
  (career totals: 11 seasons, 45-39-7, .533)          
1948-49 Arthur Valpey 2 5 12 0 .294
1950-56 Lloyd P. Jordan 7 24 31 3 .440
1957-70 John M. Yovicsin 14 78 42 5 .644
1971-93 Joseph Restic 23 117 97 6 .545
1994-pres. Tim Murphy 20 137 62 0 .688
Totals: 1,272 games 138 838 384 50 .678
  + Informal Teams          
             

Percy Haughton 1899 (1908-16)
Harvard enjoyed its most prosperous era of the early 20th century when Percy Haughton, a member of the Crimson’s 1898 championship team, took over as the team’s head coach. Prior to Haughton’s hiring, it was customary for colleges to change head coaches every year or two, regardless of the team’s record. In nine years along the Crimson sideline, Haughton’s teams went 71-7-5, won three national championships and finished unbeaten five times. Known for his brilliant schemes that utilized deception and power, Haughton coached the Crimson until he joined the service during the first World War.

John Yovicsin (1957-70)
Arriving at Harvard in 1957 with a somewhat limited coaching background — some years as a high school coach in Pennsylvania before five years as the mentor at Gettysburg College — John Yovicsin guided Harvard through the early years of formal Ivy League competition and delivered three Ivy championships to Cambridge. He went on to win 78 games in 14 years, and his .644 winning percentage stood as the best by a Harvard coach with more than five years on the sideline since 1926.

Joe Restic (1971-93)
The man who came to define Harvard Football through three decades, Joe Restic coached more games and won more games than any head coach in Crimson history. Restic and his trademark multiflex offense helped Harvard win five Ivy League championships, including a pair of outright titles and back-to-back crowns on two occasions. In 23 years along the Harvard sideline, Restic finished with 117 wins — 39 more than anyone else in Harvard’s history — and 92 victories against Ivy League opponents, good for third in conference history.

Tim Murphy (1994-Present)
Harvard has seen its football record book rewritten under current head coach Tim Murphy. With five Ivy League championships and two undefeated seasons to his credit, Murphy and his signature no huddle, multiple-formations offense have made the Crimson at least a contender for the championship every year. Murphy’s 1997 team made history as the first Harvard squad to go unbeaten and untied in Ivy League play, while his 2001 and 2004 teams stand among best in school history. The 2001 team went 9-0 overall and 7-0 in the league to finish with a perfect record for the first time in 88 years, while the 2004 squad went 10-0 for the Crimson’s best record since 1906.

The 2007 season marked its fourth undefeated league season since 1997, Harvard became the first program in the storied history of the Ivy League to record at least seven victories in seven consecutive seasons with a total of 54 wins from 2000-07.

The Crimson continued the pace in 2008 with its 13th league championship. The Crimson became just the eighth team in Ivy history to win the title after losing the league opener. An undefeated non-conference schedule propelled the Crimson to a 9-1 mark with four players being selected All-America.

In 2009 the Crimson rode a 7-3 record to put the finishing touches on a decade that saw Harvard post the second highest national winning percentage in the Football Championship Subdivision and seventh highest in all of Division I. Harvard's .768 winning percentage from 2000-09 trailed only Montana while FBS schools Texas, Boise State, Oklahoma, Ohio State and Florida were the only school sto finish shead of Tim Murphy's Crimson. Rounding out the national top 10 in the decade was LSU, USC and Appalachian State.

In 2010, Harvard kept its streak of seven-plus-win season intact with a 7-3 record. The Crimson has now won at least seven games in 10 straight seasons to expand its own record. No other program has even seven such seasons since the formation of the Ivy League.

The 2011 season saw Harvard claim its sixth Ivy League crown under Tim Murphy and 14th overall. After dropping the season opener, the Crimson reeled off nine straight wins, all by double figures, to extend its streak of seasons with at least seven wins to 11. 

During the 2012 campaign, Harvard defeated Yale for a record sixth-straight time and finished 8-2 overall, while going 5-2 in the Ancient Eight. Harvard also set an Ivy League record with 394 points scored on the season, or 39.4 per game.

Murphy led the Crimson to its 15th Ivy League title in 2013, as Harvard went 9-1 overall and 6-1 in the Ancient Eight. Harvard capped the season with a 34-7 win at Yale to extend its record win streak against the Elis to seven.